Dah Di Dah

Dah-Di-Dah Publishing Ltd

  Change is coming and it's long overdue.

  • Everybody should learn first aid, but when it's not something that you do every day, you are prone to skill fade and that means that you might struggle to carry out the correct actions during a real emergency.
  • Our unique books are an addition to, not a replacement for what trainers already provide.
  • People who learn first aid using our guides don't have to commit to a lifetime of revision. A manual cannot effectively be used to unlock knowledge during an actual emergency, our books can.
  • People who use our guides during an emergency don't have the worry of their memory letting them down.

 

  •  For companies who have adjusted their risk assessment to direct their employees to use our step-by-step guides during an emergency and who have our guides in their first aid kits. Our step-by-step guides provide companies with corporate peace of mind.
    • A lay first aider is protected by the "law of the Good Samaritan" this level of protection does not necessarily transfer across into the workplace where a nominated individual is trained in First Aid at Work and who has accepted responsibility as part of their job/role to deliver emergency first aid cover for a workforce, students, children etc. This person has a responsibility to remain competent and current in their knowledge and skills and the employer has to demonstrate that they have provided adequate time and resources to support the first-aider to remain competent. This is a grey area and is a  real challenge for any lay first-aider or employer.
      • Attending a 1 day annual refresher course demonstrates commitment but,  when first aid is not something that a person does day to day, they will suffer varying degrees of skill fade.

 

    • If the first-aider at work fails to remain competent and current, they become liable to prosecution if they do something wrong or fail to do something that would have ordinarily saved a life or prevented further injury.
      • Competence and or a failure to remain competent will ultimately be decided following a first-aiders failure to carry out appropriate actions during a medical emergency in the workplace.
    • It is not reasonable to expect a lay first-aider to commit to a lifetime of revision in anticipation for something that might never happen, but that's what we do

 

WHEN IT'S NOT SOMETHING THAT YOU DO EVERY DAY, OVER TIME, YOU WILL SUFFER SKILL FADE...

 

KNOWING THAT YOU'VE DONE EVERYTHING POSSIBLE PRICELESS.